Investigation of grammatical errors committed by Turkmen learners of English

  • Sonthida Keyuravong School of Liberal Arts, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140
  • Didar Seyitkuliyev School of Liberal Arts, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140
  • Thanis Bunsom School of Liberal Arts, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140
Keywords: English as a foreign language, grammatical errors, Turkmen learners of English

Abstract

The domination of English as a global language has penetrated every corner of the world and that includes a Central Asian country, Turkmenistan. English has replaced Russian and is currently a compulsory language for the Turkmens. However, little has been known of Turkmen learners’ English proficiency. This study was therefore conducted to investigate such issues by analysing paragraphs written by 17 participants and identifying their grammatical errors. The theoretical framework for the analysis is adapted from Byrd and Benson (1994) who divided grammatical errors into three stages with 12 sub-categories. The results demonstrate that the highest number of errors occurred in the second stage (intermediate problems), which are mainly related to word-level errors. It is however worth noting that the number of errors does not necessarily correspond with the severity of errors. Arguably, these grammatical errors of Turkmen English learners may be caused by their native language interference.  

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Published
2019-08-23
How to Cite
Keyuravong, S., Seyitkuliyev, D., & Bunsom, T. (2019). Investigation of grammatical errors committed by Turkmen learners of English. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences University of Phayao, 8(1), 96 - 117. Retrieved from https://so03.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/Humanties-up/article/view/205275