The Perception for English Final Consonants of Suratthani Rajabhat University’s Students

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Sirirat Choophan Atthaphonphiphat

Abstract

The objectives of this research was to analyze the perception for English final consonants; fricative /f, v, T, D, s, z, S, Z/ affricate /tS, dZ/ and lateral /l/. The samples of this research were 350 Suratthani Rajabhat University’s students. 33 English words with fricative, affricate, and lateral final consonants were the instrumentation for data collection. The samples listened to 33 English words from English native speaker and then chose the word they heard in the multiple choice questionnaire.  The research results showed that the samples perceived English final consonants correctly more than 50 percent. The most correctly perceived is the English final consonant  /z/  (95.4 percent) and the least correctly perceived is the English final consonant /D/ (53.4 percent). [t, p, n, N, w, d, 2] are the variants which appear when the samples perceived English final consonants incorrectly. This research showed that the differences between the mother tongue language’s sound and the target language’s sound influenced the perception.

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How to Cite
Choophan Atthaphonphiphat, S. . (2019). The Perception for English Final Consonants of Suratthani Rajabhat University’s Students. Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Suratthani Rajabhat University, 11(3), 44–71. Retrieved from https://so03.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhsc/article/view/216154
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Research Article

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