The attitudes of teachers of rural areas towards the state of learning materials, school curriculum, simulation software, and argument-based inquiry activity to enhance middle school students’ scientific reasoning ability

Main Article Content

Jettnipith Thantong
Jaitip Na-Songkhla
Pornsook Tantrarungroj

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the attitude of rural teachers towards the problem in the current state of learning materials, school curriculum, simulation software, and argument-based inquiry activity for enhancing middle school’s scientific reasoning ability. The survey research method was used in this study, and data were collected from 42 small, medium, large, and extra-large schools in Sisaket province (northeastern of Thailand) using 105 questionnaires. The research findings reveal that the analysis of descriptive statistics and PNImod showed that the essential features of simulation, which could be improved, were displaying a relationship between multivariable, feedback, and result. Likewise, the argument-based inquiry could be empowered with an emphasis on evidence or question-based evidence, presentation of evidence supporting the claim, presentation of a counter-argument, a stipulation of a conflict of arguments, and use of mathematics, information, information technologies, or computational thinking.

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How to Cite
Thantong, J., Na-Songkhla, J., & Tantrarungroj, P. (2020). The attitudes of teachers of rural areas towards the state of learning materials, school curriculum, simulation software, and argument-based inquiry activity to enhance middle school students’ scientific reasoning ability. Journal of Rattana Bundit University, 15(1), 39-53. Retrieved from https://so03.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/rbac/article/view/244479
Section
Research Article

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